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© 2020 Relevant Protocols Inc.
A space for sharing and discussing news related to global current events, technology, and society.
48992 Members
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We'll be adding more communities soon!
© 2020 Relevant Protocols Inc.
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"The FTC applies a novel remedy, going a step further than simply deleting the source photos." LATE LAST YEAR, San Francisco face-recognition startup Everalbum won a $2 million contract with the Air Force to provide “AI-driven access control.” Monday, another arm of the US government dealt the company a setback. The Federal Trade Commission said Everalbum had agreed to settle charges that it had applied face-recognition technology to images uploaded to a photo app without users’ permission and retained them after telling users they would be deleted. The startup used millions of the photos to develop technology offered to government agencies and other customers under the brand Paravision.
"The FTC applies a novel remedy, going a step further than simply deleting the source photos." LATE LAST YEAR, San Francisco face-recognition startup Everalbum won a $2 million contract with the Air Force to provide “AI-driven access control.” Monday, another arm of the US government dealt the company a setback. The Federal Trade Commission said Everalbum had agreed to settle charges that it had applied face-recognition technology to images uploaded to a photo app without users’ permission and retained them after telling users they would be deleted. The startup used millions of the photos to develop technology offered to government agencies and other customers under the brand Paravision.
The settlement throws a shadow on Paravision’s reputation, but chief product officer Joey Pritikin says the company can still fulfill its Air Force contract and obligations to other clients. The startup shut the consumer app in August, the same month it learned of a potential FTC complaint, and it launched face-recognition technology developed without data from the app in September.
The settlement throws a shadow on Paravision’s reputation, but chief product officer Joey Pritikin says the company can still fulfill its Air Force contract and obligations to other clients. The startup shut the consumer app in August, the same month it learned of a potential FTC complaint, and it launched face-recognition technology developed without data from the app in September.
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