Bringing context and critique to the cultural moment. Deep dives, reviews, and debate encouraged.
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© 2020 Relevant Protocols Inc.
Bringing context and critique to the cultural moment. Deep dives, reviews, and debate encouraged.
40672 Members
We'll be adding more communities soon!
© 2020 Relevant Protocols Inc.
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"The white cube exhibition space in the Kunstverein Hannover is quiet, as such spaces are designed to be. An unmanned market stand; clothes hanging on racks; sliced loaves of bread loaves lying on a table; the shattered ruins of a wall hang heavily in the balance. Daily Bread, the first retrospective show by Ukrainian artist Zhanna Kadyrova, feels like a set for a performance that is yet to occur, or perhaps one that has already happened. Our daily bread, the basic necessities one needs to live—food, clothing, shelter—are transferred into another sphere of consumption, not directly through the body—that is to say, by eating, covering, or dwelling—but symbolically; theoretically, through the appropriation, the art market operates, in which these objects become artistic effigies of necessity. In Daily Bread, as the title already suggests, art is more about necessity than about contemplative reflection."
"The white cube exhibition space in the Kunstverein Hannover is quiet, as such spaces are designed to be. An unmanned market stand; clothes hanging on racks; sliced loaves of bread loaves lying on a table; the shattered ruins of a wall hang heavily in the balance. Daily Bread, the first retrospective show by Ukrainian artist Zhanna Kadyrova, feels like a set for a performance that is yet to occur, or perhaps one that has already happened. Our daily bread, the basic necessities one needs to live—food, clothing, shelter—are transferred into another sphere of consumption, not directly through the body—that is to say, by eating, covering, or dwelling—but symbolically; theoretically, through the appropriation, the art market operates, in which these objects become artistic effigies of necessity. In Daily Bread, as the title already suggests, art is more about necessity than about contemplative reflection."
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