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Bringing context and critique to the cultural moment. Deep dives, reviews, and debate encouraged.
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© 2020 Relevant Protocols Inc.
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"Art in the Age of the Internet: 1989 to Today,” an exhibition that was on view at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston earlier this year, promised to “examin[e] how the internet has radically changed the field of art, especially in its production, distribution, and reception.” The survey “I Was Raised on the Internet,” currently at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, “focuses on how the internet has changed the way we experience the world.” In 2015, the periodic New Photography exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York carried a title—“Ocean of Images”—that characterized the internet as “a vortex of images, a site of piracy, and a system of networks,” and claimed to “prob[e] the effects of an image-based post-Internet reality.” “Electronic Superhighway: 2016–1966” at the Whitechapel Gallery in London aimed “to show the impact of computer and internet technologies on artists from the mid-1960s to the present day.” Back in 2001, John Weber, one of the curators of “010101: Art in Technological Times” at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, made an observation that could easily be slipped into a statement for any of the more recent shows: “many contemporary artists are responding to the superabundance of material goods, information, and images in the world today, an upwelling of pictures and products that is itself inextricably linked to technological culture.”
"Art in the Age of the Internet: 1989 to Today,” an exhibition that was on view at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston earlier this year, promised to “examin[e] how the internet has radically changed the field of art, especially in its production, distribution, and reception.” The survey “I Was Raised on the Internet,” currently at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, “focuses on how the internet has changed the way we experience the world.” In 2015, the periodic New Photography exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York carried a title—“Ocean of Images”—that characterized the internet as “a vortex of images, a site of piracy, and a system of networks,” and claimed to “prob[e] the effects of an image-based post-Internet reality.” “Electronic Superhighway: 2016–1966” at the Whitechapel Gallery in London aimed “to show the impact of computer and internet technologies on artists from the mid-1960s to the present day.” Back in 2001, John Weber, one of the curators of “010101: Art in Technological Times” at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, made an observation that could easily be slipped into a statement for any of the more recent shows: “many contemporary artists are responding to the superabundance of material goods, information, and images in the world today, an upwelling of pictures and products that is itself inextricably linked to technological culture.”
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