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Interview with one of the French translators of Emma Goldman's work on how her writing continues to inspire contemporary social change.
"Gender norms compound the trauma for men who are victims of rape and sexual abuse. It’s time to give them support, says Guardian columnist Owen Jones" This feels so important as cultures everywhere deal with male mental health and trauma issues and combatting destructive gender norms.
“Such deprivation of liberty does not constitute a circumscribed sanction for a specific offense, but an open-ended progressively severe measure of coercion,” Melzer, the U.N. special rapporteur, wrote of Manning’s treatment. It does not take a U.N. expert to recognize the current conditions of Manning’s incarceration as a form of torture. It is the very definition of torture to submit a person to physical and mental suffering in an effort to force an action from them.
"Omar Hassan surveys world politics at the turn of the decade, with a focus on the exhilarating return of mass revolutionary struggle."
‘A recent poll of people aged 18-35 by a state think-tank found 52% of those living in smaller towns and cities had moved there after spending on average three years in top-tier cities, citing the fast pace of life.’ An interesting news item that steers away from an-prim framings and ...Read More
A central class divide between care-givers and administrators now runs directly through the middle of most parties on the left. Excellent post-Corbyn post-mortem.
From April but deserves a re-read "Ecological pain has been the subject of a growing body of academic study. The environmental philosopher Glenn Albrecht coined the word solastalgia to describe it while he worked at the University of Newcastle in NSW. Specifically, solastalgia is the feeling of distress associated with environmental change close to your home. ...Read More
"Many of the internet’s commodified social spaces weaponize a basic need to connect with others, mechanizing a fundamentally human desire in closely surveilled corridors. Rather than facilitating connections between people, privately-held platforms redesign the internet in capital’s image, boxing time and attention into commodified forms and compelling us to produce ...Read More
This: "Disaster experts can predict how most people will react: Most will try to work together to save the most people possible. But there is a notable exception. The richest people on the ship are the least likely to cooperate. There is a formal term for this, based on a ...Read More
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I've seen a lot of people critiquing the use of memes re: Iran. Does anyone have thoughts on the use of memes as a coping mechanism for chaotic times? Should we utilize memes as cathartic tool when faced with global catastrophes that feel beyond our control? Or is it inconsiderate ...Read More
"Academia has effectively accepted that universities now represent a site for consumption rather than intellectual endeavor. (...) The pursuit of “knowledge for its own sake,” reserved for faculty and graduate students who agree to play by the rules, hides the extent to which the university has been domesticated by capitalism."
“Many influencers prefer the short-term rental structure of Airbnb, in part because obtaining a lease can be tough when you’re young and have an unpredictable income. But unfortunately many Airbnbs in Los Angeles have a no-filming rule. (Homeowners worry about, among other things, tripods scratching the floors and the potential property damage that comes with YouTube stunts.) ...Read More
Do you want to find new research? #TheSyllabus (by Evgeny Morozov) is definitely a place to go, here is a link to their 2019 favorites. This is massive, enjoy! 📚🔗🌀🧠
“Radicant living has been codified and commodified via the neverending global schedule of biennials, art fairs, panels and openings. Tech companies like Airbnb and Uber extract profit from mobility as we rely on them for on-demand apartments and rides in each new city, while critics and curators fare no better It’s a lifestyle the critic Andrew Berardini both summarized and parodied in a 2014 essay for the Canadian art website Momus, ‘How to Survive International Art: Notes from the Poverty Jetset’. Already that piece reads like a nostalgic elegy for a bygone time. Berardini trades Bourriaud’s theoretical polemics for a ...Read More