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A space for sharing and discussing news related to global current events, technology, and society.
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© 2020 Relevant Protocols Inc.
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RISE OF THE MACHINES: MARIO CARPO ON ROBOTIC CONSTRUCTION. "Today, however, intelligent robots tasked with building a wall in an open field could in theory scan the horizon, pick and choose from the stones and boulders in sight, analyze, combine, and assemble those pieces as found to minimize waste, and pack them together without any need for infill or mortar. Likewise, intelligent robots could, theoretically, compose with the random shapes and structural irregularities of natural timber, fitting together each log as found, or almost, without having to bring it to a faraway plant, slice it, or reduce it to pulp, then mix it with glue and other chemicals to convert it into boards with standard measurements and tested structural performance. Preindustrial artisans—living as they did in a world of physiocratic penury, where manufacturing and building were at the mercy of local supplies of materials and labor—had to make do with whatever they found on-site. Today, we can use computation and robotic labor to reproduce at least some of this preindustrial artisanal economy and its inherent, circular sustainability"
RISE OF THE MACHINES: MARIO CARPO ON ROBOTIC CONSTRUCTION. "Today, however, intelligent robots tasked with building a wall in an open field could in theory scan the horizon, pick and choose from the stones and boulders in sight, analyze, combine, and assemble those pieces as found to minimize waste, and pack them together without any need for infill or mortar. Likewise, intelligent robots could, theoretically, compose with the random shapes and structural irregularities of natural timber, fitting together each log as found, or almost, without having to bring it to a faraway plant, slice it, or reduce it to pulp, then mix it with glue and other chemicals to convert it into boards with standard measurements and tested structural performance. Preindustrial artisans—living as they did in a world of physiocratic penury, where manufacturing and building were at the mercy of local supplies of materials and labor—had to make do with whatever they found on-site. Today, we can use computation and robotic labor to reproduce at least some of this preindustrial artisanal economy and its inherent, circular sustainability"
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