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"My recent book Jurisdictional Accumulation develops a new account of extraterritoriality, which is the exercise of jurisdiction beyond its limits. This device is poorly studied in the early modern period, too quickly and narrowly associated with either the Ottoman capitulations, or with the chapels and confessional struggles of a few embassies in Northern Europe, which classic diplomatic historians associate with the dawn of territorial sovereignty. Instead, my argument is that extraterritoriality needs to be resituated as a key mechanism of imperial expansion, practiced differently by each empire according to their social property relations and jurisdictional struggles, and renamed as jurisdictional accumulation to emphasise its importance and more complex political and economic reach. There has been a recent upsurge of sophisticated materialist histories of international law and capitalism. If my book explores the early modern part of this history to better contextualise the specificity of capitalism, it does so not by directly tackling the question of the development of capitalism. Instead of an immanent history of capitalism and international law, Jurisdictional Accumulation digs around the agrarian revolution of the seventeenth-century English case to reveal the role of legal actors and practices in European expansion.
"My recent book Jurisdictional Accumulation develops a new account of extraterritoriality, which is the exercise of jurisdiction beyond its limits. This device is poorly studied in the early modern period, too quickly and narrowly associated with either the Ottoman capitulations, or with the chapels and confessional struggles of a few embassies in Northern Europe, which classic diplomatic historians associate with the dawn of territorial sovereignty. Instead, my argument is that extraterritoriality needs to be resituated as a key mechanism of imperial expansion, practiced differently by each empire according to their social property relations and jurisdictional struggles, and renamed as jurisdictional accumulation to emphasise its importance and more complex political and economic reach. There has been a recent upsurge of sophisticated materialist histories of international law and capitalism. If my book explores the early modern part of this history to better contextualise the specificity of capitalism, it does so not by directly tackling the question of the development of capitalism. Instead of an immanent history of capitalism and international law, Jurisdictional Accumulation digs around the agrarian revolution of the seventeenth-century English case to reveal the role of legal actors and practices in European expansion.
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