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[https://relevant.community/culture/post/5ff73a1ab0bdb30058acbe2c](https://relevant.community/culture/post/5ff73a1ab0bdb30058acbe2c)
[https://relevant.community/culture/post/5ff73a1ab0bdb30058acbe2c](https://relevant.community/culture/post/5ff73a1ab0bdb30058acbe2c)
It is well known that in much of the West, cultural narratives rarely account or allow for ecosystemic thinking, with an ecosystem understood as a tangled web of humans and nonhumans alike. Story—history, individual life, the future—is construed according to figure and ground, with the (human) figure clearly in the front and leading the way. This construction is found everywhere from political rhetoric to mass media and popular books. The novel is no exception. However, new fiction deliberately attuned to planetary symbiosis is finding ways to portray complex interconnectedness without disregarding individual experience or subjectivity.
It is well known that in much of the West, cultural narratives rarely account or allow for ecosystemic thinking, with an ecosystem understood as a tangled web of humans and nonhumans alike. Story—history, individual life, the future—is construed according to figure and ground, with the (human) figure clearly in the front and leading the way. This construction is found everywhere from political rhetoric to mass media and popular books. The novel is no exception. However, new fiction deliberately attuned to planetary symbiosis is finding ways to portray complex interconnectedness without disregarding individual experience or subjectivity.
"IN THE FIRST MONTHS OF QUARANTINE, my apartment became my personal ecosystem. The idiosyncrasies of daily life in isolation—the peculiar sleep hours, the midnight meals on the fire escape, the evening Scrabble ritual—felt entirely specific. And yet, with over half of the world’s population instructed to quarantine as well, these intimate idiosyncrasies were twinned with a totally novel feeling-in-common. When we are asked to “flatten the curve” or wear masks outdoors, we are asked to see ourselves as both individuals with agency and a collective whose influence is only made en masse. We are asked to see our microcosms as elements constituting a macrocosm. We are made ecosystemic"
"IN THE FIRST MONTHS OF QUARANTINE, my apartment became my personal ecosystem. The idiosyncrasies of daily life in isolation—the peculiar sleep hours, the midnight meals on the fire escape, the evening Scrabble ritual—felt entirely specific. And yet, with over half of the world’s population instructed to quarantine as well, these intimate idiosyncrasies were twinned with a totally novel feeling-in-common. When we are asked to “flatten the curve” or wear masks outdoors, we are asked to see ourselves as both individuals with agency and a collective whose influence is only made en masse. We are asked to see our microcosms as elements constituting a macrocosm. We are made ecosystemic"
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